Mike Mettler

Mike Mettler  |  May 24, 2019  |  0 comments
Brain Salad Surgery, Emerson, Lake & Palmer's grand progressive opus of November 1973, was the one LP I knew I could play for my fraternal grandparents to show them rock music was as legitimate an aural artform as classical or jazz. When I first cued up the original Manticore/Atlantic vinyl on their stereo console during an early-1980s visit, I began with the one-two tandem of ELP's reimagining
Mike Mettler  |  May 22, 2019  |  0 comments
If you enjoy discovering new music, you need to check out Bandcamp.
Mike Mettler  |  May 15, 2019  |  0 comments
Kiefer Sutherland called us before heading out to a band rehearsal to discuss the songwriting process for his fine new album Reckless & Me, his love of vinyl, how playing music live has informed his subsequent acting choices, and what kind of music Jack Bauer and Tom Kirkman might have on their personal playlists.
Mike Mettler  |  May 01, 2019  |  1 comments
Queen’s fourth studio effort, November 1975’s A Night at the Opera, was a masterstroke of mid-1970s multitrack recording. We dissect the ins and outs of the groundbreaking album's fair share of multiple-format releases over its 44-year lifespan (and counting).
Mike Mettler  |  Apr 17, 2019  |  0 comments
On April 8, Aerosmith delivered a 90-minute performance for the ages inside the THX Certified Park Theater at the Park MGM in Las Vegas during their Deuces Are Wild residency. Our exclusive VIP section review shows how the combined powers of THX, L-Acoustics’ L-ISA Immersive Hyperreal Sound technology, the MIXhalo live-audio mixing platform, and 1MORE THX Certified triple-driver in-ear headphones all helped make it happen.
Mike Mettler  |  Apr 16, 2019  |  1 comments
If the Moody Blues' most brazen, brave, and bold November 1967 mixture of conceptual rock and broad classical arrangements known as Days of Future Passed both saved their career and opened newer doors of sonic perception for them (and us) to walk through, then their mind-expanding July 1968 follow-up, In Search of the Lost Chord, truly cemented their position as purveyors of some of the headiest of mixes to essentially usher in a new era of progressive music. Indeed, the magnificent Moodies' late-'60s and early-'70s stereo mixes are often credited with helping to sell the true advantages the then-burgeoning FM format had over AM radio in the United States.
Mike Mettler  |  Apr 09, 2019  |  0 comments
Performance
Sound
Rush was on a roll. After the celebrated Canadian trio had finally broken through the FM ether with 1976's dystopian statement piece 2112, they took the next evolutionary sonic turn with 1977's expansively majestic A Farewell to Kings. The following year, Rush rotated the screws once again by taking their proto-prog metal to the headiest of limits on 1978's Hemispheres, their final mind-altering statement of the Me-So-Introspective Decade before shedding their muso-skins yet again with 1980's forward-thinking Permanent Waves.
Mike Mettler  |  Apr 03, 2019  |  0 comments
We called retro-cool singer/guitarist Nick Waterhouse at his homebase in Southern California to discuss his finely soulful new self-titled album and how an artist’s name can come to define their personal brand of sound, how he reconciled his mono tendencies with making an album in stereo, and the clever but logical way he mixes his passion for both 45s and 33s.
Mike Mettler  |  Mar 22, 2019  |  1 comments
Once you let Roon manage your digital audio playback, your multizone listening aspirations will be fulfilled.
Mike Mettler  |  Mar 20, 2019  |  0 comments
Keyboard maestro Reese Wynans called us from his homebase in Nashville to discuss how he and producer/partner Joe Bonamassa decided where his organ should appear in the final mixes of his first ever solo album Sweet Release, why he began listening to vinyl again, and how he had to instantly be on his A-game when he first joined up with Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble.

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