Gary Frisch

Gary Frisch  |  Jun 19, 2007  |  0 comments
Video: 4
Audio: 4
Extras: 4
For those who thought the world wasn’t ready for a fair-haired James Bond, Daniel Craig acquits himself extremely well in this twenty-first entry in the franchise, which plays fast and loose with the series’ chronology to show the super spy as a newly minted double-0. Cool, steely-eyed, and, above all, physically and emotionally vulnerable, this Bond can actually love a woman, although we learn in short order why he stopped doing so. In this installment, Bond infiltrates an arms financier’s high-stakes poker game staged to win back clients’ lost money. While the story line doesn’t hold up to close scrutiny, we get to see the evolution of the shaken vodka martini and the spy’s signature line of introduction.
Gary Frisch  |  May 01, 2007  |  0 comments
Video: 4
Audio: 3
Extras: 1
They say that you have to reach your nadir before you can start to rebound. If that’s the case, then Ben Affleck’s career might very well be on the upswing following his portrayal of a tormented Hollywood agent in this bland movie that seems to defy genre classification. Not funny enough to be a comedy yet too light on its feet to be a drama or character study, Man About Town is simply a low-budget throwaway that probably rated too poorly to merit theatrical distribution in the United States.
Gary Frisch  |  Apr 24, 2007  |  Published: Oct 24, 2006  |  0 comments
Video: 3
Audio: 2
Extras: 3
RV had good potential, but even Robin Williams’ presence fails to turn this retread into anything more than a forgettable evening’s rental. Everything about this story of a man dragging his family on a road trip in a rented recreational vehicle—from the overly enthusiastic but bumbling dad, to the resentful kids and the family bond forged on four wheels—was done better in National Lampoon’s Vacation. That doesn’t mean RV is devoid of laughs. There are enough chuckles to keep nondiscriminating viewers reasonably entertained, and the overly long waste-disposal sequence should evoke gales of laughter from the kids. But you’ll be left with a “been there, done that” feeling.
Gary Frisch  |  Apr 13, 2007  |  0 comments
The film is almost an afterthought in this recent crop of enhanced DVD packages.

In the beginning, there was DVD.

Gary Frisch  |  Apr 13, 2007  |  0 comments
Video: 3
Audio: 4
Extras: 5
The magical world of Narnia gets even more enchanted with this massive four-disc set, available both alone and as part of a gift package that includes collectible bookends. The film itself is seven minutes longer than the theatrical release and the two previous DVD versions, but there’s nothing to call out the new material.
Gary Frisch  |  Apr 13, 2007  |  0 comments
Video: 4
Audio: 4
Extras: 3
Michael Mann revisits the iconic ‘80s TV show he helmed with this humorless, straight-for-the-jugular film adaptation, which puts Colin Farrell’s Crockett and Jamie Foxx’s Tubbs deep undercover against a drug cartel. In his audio commentary, the director terms the DVD the “more extensive” cut—completed weeks after the release of the theatrical version—rather than the “extended” or “director’s” cut. In any case, this unrated version runs six minutes longer and, presumably, includes some violent moments not seen theatrically.
Gary Frisch  |  Apr 13, 2007  |  Published: Aug 13, 2006  |  0 comments
Video: 4
Audio: 4
Extras: 3
Steven Spielberg strikes a conciliatory tone in his introduction to this two-disc presentation of his acclaimed revenge opus. Clearly responding to some criticism, he notes that he is “in no way, shape, or form” attacking Israel in the film. We’ll take him at his word; however, Munich is a harsh look at how the country sought to avenge the kidnapping and murder of its athletes at the 1972 Olympics by implementing its own campaign of sanctioned murder.
Gary Frisch  |  Apr 13, 2007  |  Published: Aug 13, 2006  |  0 comments
Video: 4
Audio: 3
Extras: 0
Forbidden love is a frequent Woody Allen theme, and it’s at the root of his latest, highly acclaimed film. Shot entirely in England, Match Point tells the story of Chris (Jonathan Rhys Meyers), a former tennis pro who falls game, set, and match for the sensuous American Nola (Scarlett Johansson). The problem is, Nola’s engaged to Tom, who’s not only Chris’ good friend but may soon be his brother-in-law by way of Chris’ pending marriage to Tom’s sister, Chloe.
Gary Frisch  |  Apr 06, 2007  |  Published: Jul 06, 2006  |  0 comments
Video: 4
Audio: 3
Extras: 3
Mirabelle’s life is about as humdrum as the dress gloves she sells behind the counter at Saks Fifth Avenue are anachronistic. Beautifully portrayed by Claire Danes, Mirabelle wanders through her existence, not quite certain whether she even deserves to find happiness. Of course, she does, and it comes in the form of a rich entrepreneur (Steve Martin), although his plans for the future aren’t as grandiose as hers.
Gary Frisch  |  Apr 06, 2007  |  Published: Mar 06, 2006  |  0 comments
Video: 4
Audio: 4
Extras: 3
A terrific musical score, a multifaceted performance from Tom Hanks, and a cool-to-watch animation style help elevate a disappointingly conventional Christmas story to a potential holiday classic.

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