Throwback Thursday

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SV Staff  |  Oct 11, 2018  |  3 comments
Just don’t tell Ken Pohlmann. Having recently proclaimed that Cassettes Are Not Making a Comeback, he’ll just laugh.
SV Staff  |  Sep 27, 2018  |  1 comments
Twenty-two years ago this month, Silicon Valley startup WebTV made a noble effort to bring the internet to the big screen with the launch of a set-top box that connected any TV to the internet. Noble because the World Wide Web was a wide-open frontier with only 36 million users worldwide. (Today, more than 4 billion people are online.) A good 92% of the American public had yet to even experience the internet let alone think about searching the web on their TV. Oh, and internet access in those days was via a “dial-up” phone connection.
SV Staff  |  Sep 20, 2018  |  0 comments
To commemorate the 50th anniversary of Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 sci-fi classic 2001: A Space Odyssey, Master Replicas Group (MRG) has created a special tribute to one of the central characters in a cinematic masterpiece that portrays the ultimate showdown between man and machine.
SV Staff  |  Sep 13, 2018  |  0 comments
Americans love nostalgia. A few weeks ago a construction crew dismantled the iconic AMPEX sign along Highway 101 in Redwood City, California and many people in the community were not happy.
SV Staff  |  Aug 16, 2018  |  5 comments
In 1972, three friends from Johns Hopkins set out to capture the wonder of the live concert experience and bring it home. With a handmade wooden logo, a passion for music, and keys to a ramshackle Victorian rooming house, a famous audio company was born. Can you identify the one or more of the three young lads in the photo?
SV Staff  |  Jul 19, 2018  |  0 comments
Nineteen years ago this month, Sound & Vision had just published its fifth issue. The cover featured the “world’s biggest TV” — an 80-inch Mitsubishi rear-projection TV that was positively huge by today’s skinny-TV standards.
SV Staff  |  Jun 28, 2018  |  0 comments
Forty-three years ago this month, Sony introduced the Betamax videocassette recorder in America, a month after the iconic product made its worldwide debut in Japan.
Laurence Greenhill  |  May 17, 2018  |  9 comments
The results of blind listening tests with eleven audio experts.

Editor's Note, 2018: In the early 1980s, esoteric high-end audio as we know it today was just taking off as an alternative to the mass-market equipment offered in neighborhood TV/appliance stores. Fueled by an underground audio press that included magazines and newsletters such as Sound & Vision sister publication Stereophile, The Absolute Sound, International Audio Review, The Audio Critic, and others, a cottage industry emerged, one populated by small manufacturers of low-volume, high-priced exotica claiming greater faithfulness to the music than the gear reviewed and advertised in the pages of Stereo Review, High Fidelity, Audio, et al.

Rob Sabin  |  Apr 26, 2018  |  5 comments
Julian Hirsch’s review of the Bose 901 in 1968 helped set off one of the greatest and longest-lasting audiophile debates.

There may be no singular product in modern audio history that has generated more accolades, derision, or pure controversy than the Bose 901 loudspeaker. Introduced in 1968 by a then four-year-old concern named after its MIT-educated founder, the 901 neither looked, nor sounded, like any speaker that had come before it. With its pentagonal cabinet that faced eight of its nine identical 4-inch, full-range drivers at the reflecting wall behind the speaker, its designer Amar Bose sought to have it mimic the way we hear in concert halls and imbue its sound with a giant soundstage and spatial realism that was unsurpassed.

Stewart Wolpin  |  Apr 05, 2018  |  2 comments
Our modern AV world arguably all stems from a single product: the Ampex 200A, the first successful commercial magnetic audiotape recorder, which debuted 70 years ago this month.
Rob Sabin  |  Mar 29, 2018  |  4 comments
For decades, the cartoons of Charles Rodrigues poked fun at us and the hobby we otherwise take all too seriously.

In the very first issue of HiFi & Music Review in 1958, the magazine that became Stereo Review and then Sound & Vision, a gifted 31-year-old artist named Charles Rodrigues contributed the first in a string of cartoons that both celebrated, and made fun of, that odd bird known as the audiophile. It ended up being a long run that lasted more than 40 years.

Michael Antonoff  |  Mar 15, 2018  |  1 comments
When Netflix launched its DVD-by-mail service 20 years ago, the dozens of websites selling DVDs said the newcomer would never survive. Funny how almost all of those competitors are now long gone.
SV Staff  |  Mar 08, 2018  |  0 comments
Nineteen years ago this week, the second issue of Stereo Review’s Sound & Vision hit newsstands. Stunning cover (and content) notwithstanding, the 152-page second act of the magazine that replaced Stereo Review (which enjoyed a prosperous 40-year run) and Video (which was the videophile’s go-to magazine for 21 years) was met with much praise…but not everyone was happy.
SV Staff  |  Mar 01, 2018  |  0 comments
Sixty-four years ago this week, Westinghouse unveiled the world’s first color TV in 60 stores throughout New York. The Westinghouse H840CK15 had a tiny 15-inch screen and sold for $1,295 — the equivalent of almost 12 grand in 2018 dollars!
SV Staff  |  Feb 22, 2018  |  4 comments
Ten years ago this week, a protracted format war between the Sony’s Blu-ray format and the Toshiba-backed HD DVD format, each vying to be the anointed successor to DVD, was averted when Toshiba announced that it would stop making HD DVD players, even though close to a million players had been sold and more than 400 HD DVD titles had been released in the U.S.

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