Throwback Thursday

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SV Staff  |  May 05, 2016  |  0 comments
When New York City’s Carnegie Hall opened its doors to the public 125 years ago today, it was known simply as the Music Hall. The historic opening night, which kicked off a five-day music festival, featured guest of honor Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky conducting his Marche Solennelle.
SV Staff  |  Sep 19, 2019  |  3 comments
The super-rare Nautilus Signature 800 Edition of B&W’s iconic 800 Series speaker is the star of the show in a “System of the Week” recently featured by New Jersey-based vintage audio specialist Skyfi Audio.
SV Staff  |  Sep 13, 2018  |  0 comments
Americans love nostalgia. A few weeks ago a construction crew dismantled the iconic AMPEX sign along Highway 101 in Redwood City, California and many people in the community were not happy.
SV Staff  |  Mar 24, 2016  |  2 comments
Color TV became commercially viable in the early 1950s but didn’t really take off until the mid-1960s when the big three (and only) television networks made a concerted effort to significantly increase the amount of color programming, broadcasting classic shows like Gilligan’s Island, My Favorite Martian, and Lassie in “brilliant, true-to-life color” for the first time. An epic event if you were around to experience it and arguably more dramatic than the transition to HDTV.
Laurence Greenhill  |  May 17, 2018  |  9 comments
The results of blind listening tests with eleven audio experts.

Editor's Note, 2018: In the early 1980s, esoteric high-end audio as we know it today was just taking off as an alternative to the mass-market equipment offered in neighborhood TV/appliance stores. Fueled by an underground audio press that included magazines and newsletters such as Sound & Vision sister publication Stereophile, The Absolute Sound, International Audio Review, The Audio Critic, and others, a cottage industry emerged, one populated by small manufacturers of low-volume, high-priced exotica claiming greater faithfulness to the music than the gear reviewed and advertised in the pages of Stereo Review, High Fidelity, Audio, et al.

Robert Cobb  |  Feb 01, 2018  |  5 comments
In celebration of our 60th anniversary, Sound & Vision will be peeking back throughout this year at our past six decades of coverage. Given our long tenure, our editorial predecessors have reported on most of the seminal inventions in the history of consumer audio and video technology and have offered up shopping advice, which, to varying degrees, can be viewed today as either timeless or charmingly outdated. As much as possible, we will reproduce articles and reviews as they appeared, with the unedited text mated alongside the original illustrations.
SV Staff  |  Jul 28, 2016  |  8 comments
True, the VCR has been effectively dead for years but that didn’t stop Japan-based Funai Electric from selling more than 750,000 VHS machines last year. Where they sold ’em and who bought ’em is an interesting question but none of that matters anymore as this surprising vestige of the past comes to an end.
SV Staff  |  Jul 14, 2016  |  0 comments
Akai (July 1977, art by Charles Bragg), BIC (1975), Carver (1980)

Enjoy this multi-part collage recalling long-forgotten audio brands, represented here by iconic advertising of the day.

SV Staff  |  Jul 21, 2016  |  0 comments
Nakamichi (October 1977), Nikko (December 1974), Optonica (March 1979)

Last week we presented a selection of iconic ’70s-era advertisements from long-forgotten brands with names that fall in the first half of the alphabet (A–M). Our favorites included the Carver ad showing a young Bob Carver hamming it up, Garrard’s “Improve Your Hearing for $200” turntable ad, and the iconic Maxell ad depicting a listener getting “blown away.” Here we pick up where we left off, starting with classics from Nakamichi, Nikko, and Optonica. Watch for Part 3, our final installment, next week.

SV Staff  |  Aug 04, 2016  |  1 comments
Enjoy this multi-part collage recalling long-forgotten audio brands, represented here by iconic advertising of the day.

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