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 |  Sep 26, 1999  |  0 comments

L.A.'s Beverly Hilton Hotel will be swarming with television executives and technical gurus this week as the <A HREF="http://www.cemacity.org/">Consumer Electronics Manufacturers Association</A> (CEMA) hosts its fifth Digital Television Summit conference. The conference officially begins Tuesday, September 28, preceeded by a reception Monday evening featuring a high-definition broadcast of <I>Monday Night Football</I>.

Barry Willis  |  Sep 19, 1999  |  0 comments

An ambitious plan to bring high-speed interactive video services to cable subscribers in the New York area has been announced by <A HREF="http://www.sony.com/">Sony Corporation</A> and <A HREF="http://www.cablevision.com/">Cablevision Systems Corporation</A>. Sony will supply approximately 3 million set-top converter boxes to Cablevision customers.

 |  Sep 19, 1999  |  0 comments

People love to watch movies at home, a fact verified by a recent report from the <A HREF="http://www.cemacity.org/">Consumer Electronics Manufacturers Association</A>. Almost 20 million American households now have home-theater systems, according to CEMA. Statistics show that during the first half of 1999 sales to dealers of home-theater products rose 6%, to $3.9 billion, up from $3.6 billion during the same period last year.

Barry Willis  |  Sep 19, 1999  |  0 comments

Movie fans don't normally associate an organization as stodgy as the <A HREF="http://www.AICPA.org/">American Institute of Certified Public Accountants</A> (AICPA) with the glamour of Hollywood, but as of Tuesday, September 14, the accountants' group will have had an everlasting effect on the industry and its notoriously loose accounting procedures. A new set of rules about the way the industry figures profits and losses will soon cause some irrevocable changes in the financial picture of the movie business.

jon iverson  |  Sep 19, 1999  |  0 comments

Planet Hollywood in New York hosted the world premiere of <I><A HREF="http://www.shootyoudown.com">underdogs</A></I> at the New York International Independent Film Video and Arts Festival this past weekend, but, in an effort to get the film from the launch party into the market, the writer-director has listed the rights to the romantic comedy on <A HREF="http://www.ebay.com">eBay</A>.

jon iverson  |  Sep 19, 1999  |  0 comments

Researchers at Stanford University and the University of Washington in Seattle reported last week that digital high-definition TV signals (HDTV) had been successfully transmitted across the so-called "<A HREF="http://www.Internet2.org/">Internet2</A>" network. The group says that the transmission has proved the capability of Internet technology to transmit broadcast-quality video, in stark contrast to the poor-quality video loaded onto today's commercial Internet systems.

Wes Phillips  |  Sep 19, 1999  |  0 comments

P<I>atrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes, Brent Spinner, Levar Burton, Michael Dorn, Gates McFadden, Marina Sirtis, F. Murray Abraham, Donna Murphy, Anthony Zerbe. Directed by Jonathan Frakes. Aspect ratio: 2.35:1 (anamorphic). Dolby Digital 5.1. 108 minutes. 1998. Paramount 335887. PG. $29.99.</I>

Barry Willis  |  Sep 12, 1999  |  0 comments

Competition in the personal video recorder market heated up considerably on September 8, when <A HREF="http://www.sony.com/">Sony Corporation of America</A> announced that it had made an equity investment in <A HREF="http://www.tivo.com/">TiVo, Inc</A>. TiVo is a Sunnyvale, California-based maker of personal video recorders (PVRs), a new category of product using hard-disk technology for time-shifting television viewing.

 |  Sep 12, 1999  |  0 comments

According to a report issued last week by <A HREF="http://www.alliedworld.com">Allied Business Intelligence</A>, a worldwide conversion from traditional analog broadcasts to digital images is creating a windfall for those producing consumer set-top boxes. Findings in the report, "Digital Set-Top Boxes: World Markets, Architectures, and Vendors," also indicate that the global installed base of digital set-top boxes will reach 252 million units by the end of 2004. The report states that two key factors driving the demand will be the use of digital set-top boxes by both DBS and cable subscribers. Growth in terrestrial digital TV decoder boxes is likely to be significantly slower, according to the research.

jon iverson  |  Sep 12, 1999  |  0 comments

The recently released "World DVD Planning Report" is predicting that US sales of DVD software this year will reach 57 million discs (worth $1.5 billion), and that by 2005 more than 1.3 billion discs will be shipped annually (worth $36 billion). Annual sales of DVD players are predicted to reach 9.1 million units in 1999, a growth rate of 128%, and will continue to soar, reaching 52 million by 2005. More forecasts: Video titles currently account for over 90% of the software market, but by 2005 their share will have fallen to 43%, while DVD-ROM will account for 28% and games formats 24%.

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