Top Picks TVs

Flat Panels


Vizio M65-E0 LCD Ultra HDTV: $932
(2018 model, $932 on Amazon.com as of 7/3/19; original price $1,100)
The 65-inch model in Vizio’s midrange M Series offers substantial improvements over its predecessor, including higher peak brightness when displaying high dynamic range (HDR) sources and an extended color gamut that rivals what you get with more expensive TVs. You’ll have to live with a single HDMI 2.0a port but that may be a small price to pay for performance that reviewer Al Griffin called impressive. (January 2018, Read Full Review)


Sony XBR-65X900F LCD Ultra HDTV: $1,498
(2018 model, $1,498 on crutchfield.com as of 7/2/19; original price $2,300)
Sony has a brilliant LCD alternative for TV buyers who love the look of OLED but aren’t ready to pay the higher price. Armed with an exceptional Dolby Vision Picture Mode and Sony’s X1 Extreme video processor, the 65X900F delivers a stunning OLED-like 4K picture for a reasonable price. Reviewer Tom Norton wrote: “The X900F equals OLED technology when it comes to color and resolution, and exceeds it with punchier HDR highlights.” (Posted 7/19/18, Read Full Review)


Sony XBR-65X900E LCD Ultra HDTV: $1,700
(2017 model, $1,700 on sony.com as of 7/2/19; original price $2,000)
Sony’s stylish 65-inch Ultra HDTV is a compelling choice for budget buyers upgrading to HDR, offering a wide assortment of streaming options, impressive light output, and excellent picture uniformity. If that’s not enough, color is accurate out of the box. As reviewer Al Griffin put it, “You could easily spend much more on a new TV, but I’m not sure you really need to.” (December 2017, Read Full Review)


Samsung QN65Q8FN LCD Ultra HDTV: $1,798
(2018 model, $1,798 on amazon.com as of 7/2/19; original price $2,799)
A step down from Samsung’s flagship Q9 4K TV, the Q8 uses full-array backlight with local dimming and QLED quantum dot technology to push LCD to its limits. The result is an impressive picture with striking detail and eye-popping contrast. “Its picture is distinguished by rich, yet balanced color and sumptuous, detailed-looking shadows,” concluded veteran reviewer Al Griffin. (Posted 8/2/18, Read Full Review)

$2,000-$4,999


Vizio PQ65-F1 LCD Ultra HDTV: $2,100
A lot can happen in a few years. In 2016, Vizio’s flagship 65-inch Ultra HD set carried a woe-is-me $6,000 pricetag. Today, the P-Series Quantum LCD — the most advanced and highest-performing Smart TV in Vizio’s line — lists for $2,100. More than just a super deal, the 65-inch PQ65-F1 is a fine performing TV that excels with high dynamic range (HDR) material. (December 2018/January 2019, Read Full Review)


LG OLED65C8PUA OLED Ultra HDTV: $2,500
(2018 model, $2,500 on amazon.com as of 7/2/19; original price $3,499)
If you’ve been pining for 4K OLED, LG’s new C8 series 65-incher could be your ticket to paradise. Buoyed by the brand’s latest picture technology and the well-executed webOS smart TV platform, the 65C8 not only exceeds the performance of last year’s C7 series TVs but costs considerably less. Highly recommended by resident video guru Tom Norton. (Posted 7/26/18, Read Full Review)


Samsung QN65Q80R LCD Ultra HDTV: $2,800
Apart from putting up an invitingly bright 4K image with excellent color rendering and superb high dynamic range (HDR), the 65-inch QN65Q80R is extraordinarily well equipped for a TV that sells for less than three grand, offering a full complement of features — including numerous picture adjustments, an Ambient Mode that displays photos and art when the TV is not in use, and a wealth of smart TV features, including voice control. (August/September 2019, Read Full Review)


Sony XBR-65Z9D LCD Ultra HDTV: $2,998
(2017 model, $2,998 on brandsmartusa.com as of 7/3/19; original price $5,500)
Sony draws on its decades-long history as a television innovator to create a TV that draws on 4K resolution and high dynamic range (HDR) processing to deliver “supremely real” images. Reviewer Tom Norton wrote, “In the dark, underground library scene in Oblivion — as Jack is chased by the Scavs and as flashes from his rifle land in your lap — you realize you’re not in Kansas anymore.” (January 2017, Read Full Review)


LG OLED65E7P OLED Ultra HDTV: $3,498
(2017 model, $3,498 on valueelectronics.com as of 7/3/19; original price $5,000)
Think of LG’s 65-inch OLED65E7P 4K OLED TV as a lower cost, yet still excellent performing alternative to the the stunning, near-paper-thin W7 series OLED65W7P. How excellent? For veteran TV reviewer Tom Norton, picture quality was “as close to [perfect] as I’ve experienced” with superb resolution and high dynamic range (HDR) performance that adds realism without distracting from a movie’s story line. (September 2017, Read Full Review)


Sony XBR-65Z9F LCD Ultra HDTV: $3,500
Building on the success of its Z9D predecessor, Sony’s Master Series Z9F makes a strong claim for top-dog status in today’s 4K TV market. It’s a full-fledged smart TV that delivers a superb picture with spectacular high-dynamic range highlights and excellent off-axis viewing. It can handle HDR10, Dolby Vision, and HLG high-dynamic range (HDR) content and even upconverts SDR images to near HDR. (December 2018/January 2019, Read Full Review)


LG OLED65E9PUA OLED Ultra HDTV: $4,299
Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technology’s long streak of delivering the best overall picture quality among today’s 4K televisions continues with LG’s 65-inch OLED65E9PUA. Though not as bright as its LCD counterparts, the E9’s wafer thin screen comes as close to fully covering the P3 color gamut as we’ve seen from any TV, while delivering breathtaking images with superb black levels, outstanding color and detail, and almost unrestricted off-center viewing. (August/September 2019, Read Full Review)

$5,000 >


LG Signature OLED65W7P OLED Ultra HDTV: $5,000
(2017 model, $5,000 on brandsmartusa.com as of 7/3/19; original price $8,000)
The future has arrived in the form of LG’s flagship TV, an impossibly thin HDR-enabled 4K OLED model that will blow your mind with its sci-fi aesthetic and best-in-class performance. Designed strictly for wall mounting, the 0.15-inch screen offloads the speakers, processing circuitry, power supply, and AV connectors to a svelte soundbar that attaches via a flat umbilical cord. (June 2017, Read Full Review)

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