Throwback Thursday

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SV Staff  |  Nov 03, 2016  |  1 comments
Long before the iPod and the Walkman there was a remarkable invention called the transistor radio.
SV Staff  |  Oct 27, 2016  |  0 comments
Twenty-six years ago this month, English computer programmer and obsessive movie fan Colin (Col) Needham launched the Internet Movie Database, now known as IMDb.
SV Staff  |  Oct 20, 2016  |  3 comments
Thirty-one years ago this week, 29-year-old entrepreneur David Cook opened the first Blockbuster video store in Dallas, Texas. An investment group later bought the company and parlayed it in to a national powerhouse that became synonymous with movie rentals—from VHS to DVD to Blu-ray.
SV Staff  |  Oct 13, 2016  |  0 comments
Whether or not you’re old to enough to have lived through the Sixties and Seventies, here’s a momentous occasion in the history of electronic entertainment that takes us back to 1980, the year Ronald Reagan was elected president: Pac-Man makes its debut in U.S. arcades and goes on to become not only the first mega-hit video game in history but an icon in pop culture.

SV Staff  |  Oct 06, 2016  |  0 comments
Sixty-six years ago this week AT&T Bell Laboratories researchers John Bardeen, Walter Brattain, and William Shockley were granted a U.S. Patent for a device that would become a fundamental building block of modern electronics for decades to come—the transistor.
SV Staff  |  Sep 29, 2016  |  7 comments
My how times have changed. Fifteen years ago in the September 2001 issue we reviewed Samsung’s Tantus 32-inch HDTV Monitor. It was the early days of high-def and, yes, those clunky vacuum tube TVs that dominated TV for half a century were still around.
SV Staff  |  Sep 22, 2016  |  0 comments
Twenty-five years ago this week a little-known band from Seattle called Nirvana released their second album, Nevermind.
SV Staff  |  Sep 08, 2016  |  0 comments
Eleven years ago this week, Apple introduced the ultra sleek iPod Nano. The Nano was a replacement for the hugely popular iPod Mini, which drove the number of iPods sold from 2 million to 10 million by the end of 2004, just 12 months after it was introduced.
SV Staff  |  Sep 01, 2016  |  1 comments
Fifteen years ago Al Griffin and David Ranada teamed up to conduct a double-blind listening test with a half dozen $300-a-pair bookshelf speakers. (Gotta love those Sam Sisco caricatures!) Models from Acoustic Energy, Boston Acoustics, Jamo, KEF, Monitor Audio, and NHT were set up in two groups of three with each stereo pair situated so the “listener only had to turn his head slightly to bring the sonic image of each pair into focus.”
SV Staff  |  Aug 25, 2016  |  2 comments
A promising new movie format called DVD was the theme of the August 1998 issue of Stereo Review, the 40-year-old magazine that would take on a new identity six months later with the debut of Sound & Vision.
SV Staff  |  Aug 18, 2016  |  1 comments
Say what you will about Abba but the ‘70s pop band is able to lay claim a small but significant piece of tech history. The Swedish group’s final studio album The Visitors was the world’s first commercially produced CD when it rolled off the production line 34 years ago this week at the Philips/Polygram-owned CD manufacturing plant in Langenhagen, Germany.
SV Staff  |  Aug 11, 2016  |  3 comments
When Music Television, better known as MTV, launched 35 years ago this month—12:01am on August 1, 1981 to be precise—the idea of a 24-hour video music channel was foreign (as it is again today) yet fascinating as we got to see beloved pop heroes “playing” music against often outlandish video sets.
SV Staff  |  Aug 04, 2016  |  1 comments
Enjoy this multi-part collage recalling long-forgotten audio brands, represented here by iconic advertising of the day.
SV Staff  |  Jul 28, 2016  |  8 comments
True, the VCR has been effectively dead for years but that didn’t stop Japan-based Funai Electric from selling more than 750,000 VHS machines last year. Where they sold ’em and who bought ’em is an interesting question but none of that matters anymore as this surprising vestige of the past comes to an end.
SV Staff  |  Jul 21, 2016  |  0 comments
Nakamichi (October 1977), Nikko (December 1974), Optonica (March 1979)

Last week we presented a selection of iconic ’70s-era advertisements from long-forgotten brands with names that fall in the first half of the alphabet (A–M). Our favorites included the Carver ad showing a young Bob Carver hamming it up, Garrard’s “Improve Your Hearing for $200” turntable ad, and the iconic Maxell ad depicting a listener getting “blown away.” Here we pick up where we left off, starting with classics from Nakamichi, Nikko, and Optonica. Watch for Part 3, our final installment, next week.

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