PROJECTOR TECH

Sort By: Post Date | Title | Publish Date
Geoffrey Morrison  |  Jul 05, 2006  |  0 comments
Special screens for special purposes.

There are a number of reasons why front projection doesn't have the same popularity as other display methods. The biggest factor is integrating the screen and projector into an environment that has to be lived in. Sure, some of us (like me) have no problem blocking out all light in our living rooms so we can watch our projector during the day. I also don't have kids that could muck up the screen. If either of these issues has prevented you from going front projection, check out these screens.

Darryl Wilkinson  |  Oct 28, 2005  |  First Published: Jun 28, 2005  |  0 comments
Acoustically transparent projection screens let you put the voices where the action is.

When you see a movie in a commercial cinema, it's easy to suspend disbelief and pretend you're watching the action through a window. One important reason for this is the fact that the sound of the characters' voices seems to come from their apparent location, rather than from above or below the screen.

Jed Deame  |  Oct 28, 2005  |  First Published: Nov 28, 2005  |  0 comments
Geoffrey Morrison  |  Oct 28, 2005  |  0 comments
We frequently get e-mails from readers asking why they should spend big $s on a home theater product when they can get a similar product for much less. Good question! So, this is the first in a series of GearWorks in which we'll discuss that very topic. We'll start with perhaps the easiest component to track: projectors. Where does the money go?
Thomas J. Norton  |  Jul 24, 2005  |  1 comments
You want the big-screen experience. You want to be immersed in the image. Ten feet wide at least, maybe 12. You've chosen the projector—a home model that's been getting great reviews. Obviously, you need a screen.

Pages

X