OTHER TECH

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Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Mar 29, 2010  |  0 comments

You've probably seen them outside the supermarket. You know - those big red vending machines. But instead of a soda for $1.25, you get a movie. For $1. Swipe your credit/debit card, and the disc is all yours for the night. That's Redbox, and the machines are popping up everywhere, ready to supply the masses with low-commitment, impulse-rental DVDs. With 20,000 machines, each holding about 500 discs, Redbox is making tons of money. And some Hollywood studios are going ballistic.

Mike Mettler  |  Mar 29, 2010  |  0 comments

To disregard the hi-fi end of what we do is wrong,” says Tom Petty of his decision to include a Blu-ray Disc with 62 live tracks mixed in 5.1 as part of the Deluxe Edition of his career-spanning boxed set with the Heartbreakers, The Live Anthology (Reprise). That edition, is impressive indeed. Besides the Blu-ray, it comprises five live CDs, two DVDs with two previously unreleased shows, one vinyl LP, a book, lithographs, and other goodies.

Brent Butterworth  |  Mar 29, 2010  |  0 comments

Call it the projection paradox. Projector owners are so devoted to their pursuit of a cinematic effect that they're willing to spend thousands of dollars more than the average TV buyer and endure lights-out viewing. Yet all the hot technology seems to go into those sexy flat-panel TV sets that people who don't know a pixel from a pineapple buy at discount stores while they're picking up tube socks and army-size bags of Cheddar Jalapeño Cheetos.

Eric Alt  |  Mar 29, 2010  |  0 comments

Mike Mettler  |  Mar 03, 2010  |  0 comments

To disregard the hi-fi end of what we do is wrong," says Tom Petty of his decision to include a Blu-ray Disc with 62 live tracks mixed in 5.1 as part of the Deluxe Edition of his career-spanning boxed set with the Heartbreakers, The Live Anthology (Reprise). That edition, is impressive indeed.

Brent Butterworth  |  Feb 23, 2010  |  0 comments

Call it the projection paradox. Projector owners are so devoted to their pursuit of a cinematic effect that they're willing to spend thousands of dollars more than the average TV buyer and endure lights-out viewing.

 |  Feb 04, 2010  |  0 comments

Another year, another roundup of 20 amazing products. Yes, for those of us who regularly write about and test the best that the A/V world has to offer, life can get pretty repetitive - until we step back from the test bench and take a look at the big picture. What we're seeing in our 2009 Editors' Choice Awards assortment is gear that ranges in price from around $300 on up to $85,000.

Brent Butterworth  |  Feb 01, 2010  |  0 comments

On June 11, 2009, I lost a cherished friend: the Sony Watchman TV I'd owned for 20 years. When analog TV broadcasts went dead that day, my Watchman, along with every other portable analog mini-TV, suddenly became useless. A few portable digital TVs have since appeared to fill the gap, but because the ATSC digital-TV standard wasn't designed for mobile use, none of them can deliver the reliable roving reception of my 1980s-vintage Watchman.

John Sciacca  |  Jan 19, 2010  |  0 comments
Key Features
$249 US.MARANTZ.COM
• Compatible with all A/V receivers and current
Gary Dell'Abate  |  Jan 14, 2010  |  0 comments

My love for Sonos is no secret. You'd think I own stock in the company - full disclosure: I don't! - but you have to love a music-delivery product that starts out great and just keeps getting better.

Daniel Kumin  |  Jan 10, 2010  |  0 comments
Key Features
$799 Svsound.com
• Audyssey DSP room/ subwoofer equalization • Supplied
Rob Sabin  |  Jan 05, 2010  |  0 comments
Back in the early days of portable music players and digital downloads, your average audiophile could legitimately look down his (or her) nose at the whole notion and say, "Feh!" Boy, have times ever changed. Thin-sounding low-resolution MP3 files...

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