LATEST ADDITIONS

Thomas J. Norton  |  Apr 20, 2021  |  1 comments
Ken Pohlmann got the jump on me in his blog this week, but the recent permanent (?) closing of the Cinerama Dome theater in Hollywood is a significant event. Perhaps I can add a slightly different perspective.

When I lived in LA from 2000 to 2015 the Arclight theater in Hollywood was one of my go-to haunts whenever I wanted to see a top-drawer movie release in a premier theater. The Cinerama Dome was the main attraction in this multiplex, but the other Arclight screens were also impressive...

SV Staff  |  Apr 19, 2021  |  0 comments
Sad that your local movie megaplex—or palace—is still shuttered? Epson feels your pain, and to make things better, the company is offering a 10 percent discount on its Sound & Vision Top Pick-winning EpiqVision Ultra LS500 Laser Projection TV. The deal runs only for a limited time, so you have until June 1 to clear space in your pad for Epson’s ultra short throw projector, which comes bundled with either a 100-inch or 120-inch Epson SilverFlex Ultra ALR Mega Screen.
Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Apr 19, 2021  |  0 comments
Global pandemics and lockdowns have consequences. Who knew? Apparently, not everyone.

Thomas J. Norton  |  Apr 16, 2021  |  0 comments
Picture
Sound
Extras
(Cue deep, sonorous narration.) In a world infested with giant, hungry bugs, what's left of mankind has hunkered down in underground colonies where they're safe (mostly) from being eaten alive. How this post-apocalyptic nightmare began is explained in the brief opening sequence of Love and Monsters, but in short it was mankind (as usual) that messed things up.
Bob Ankosko  |  Apr 15, 2021  |  0 comments
How Pittsburgh’s Simply Automated transformed a garden oasis in the heart of the city into a magnificent outdoor entertainment space.
Al Griffin  |  Apr 14, 2021  |  0 comments

Performance
Features
Build Quality
Value
PRICE $179

AT A GLANCE
Plus
Inexpensive
Compact form factor
Good extension and output
Minus
Limited features
No wireless option

THE VERDICT
There’s nothing fancy about OSD Audio’s Nero TubeBass 10, but if you’re looking to get decent bass performance in smaller-size room without a paying a premium, it’s well worth a listen.

As someone who appreciates the benefit deep bass brings to music and movie soundtracks, I've come to accept that having a box the size of a small refrigerator in my living room is a reality of life I need to contend with. That box, of course, is a subwoofer, and welcoming one into your space is the deal you must strike in order to get deep bass. Some cleverly engineered models use innovative DSP-driven solutions, along with serious amplifier power, to coax extended bass from compact boxes— certain subs we've reviewed from JL Audio and KEF come to mind. And while such models definitely make a better fit with non-mancave-like interior spaces, you'll pay handsomely for the tech wizardry that brings about the bass miniaturization.

Bob Ankosko  |  Apr 14, 2021  |  0 comments
JBL, one of the crown jewels of Harman’s portfolio of audio brands, has announced a retro-styled bookshelf speaker that draws on decades of experience building professional monitors for recording studios.
Barb Gonzalez  |  Apr 14, 2021  |  0 comments
Roku has announced its Spring 2021 product line and new updates to the Roku operating system, Roku OS 10. There are a few new exciting products and features—some playing catchup with other systems' capabilities, and others that are leapfrogging ahead.  
 

Ken C. Pohlmann  |  Apr 12, 2021  |  0 comments
You can admit it. You are intrigued. Of course, it can’t be true. But is it purely nonsensical? Is it a “pigs can fly” kind of declaration? Or is there someway, somehow, a grain of truth in it? And if that’s the case, how on earth could you conceivably connect the dots between the Little Corporal and the Compact Disc?
Josef Krebs  |  Apr 09, 2021  |  0 comments
Picture
Sound
Extras
Closing an almost 50-year career that began with Un Chien Andalou, writer-director Luis Buñuel—aided by screenwriting partner Jean-Claude Carrière—created a trio of subversive amusements that savagely poke fun at pillars of French society, including church, military, and figures of the establishment. The master surrealist did so by playing with and disrupting conventional narrative structures, questioning the validity of his protagonists' rationality, and reducing their self-serving behavior and values to nonsense while upsetting cinematic expectations of viewers.

Pages

X